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When the Canada Pension Plan was put in place on January 1,1966, it was a relatively simple retirement savings model. Working Canadians started making contributions to the CPP when they turned 18 years of age and continued making those contributions throughout their working life. Those who had contributed could start receiving CPP on retirement, usually at the age of 65. Once an individual was receiving retirement benefits, he or she was not required (or allowed) to make further contributions to the CPP. The CPP retirement benefit for which that individual was eligible therefore could not increase (except for inflationary increases) after that point.


For all but a very fortunate few, buying a home means having to obtain financing for the portion of the purchase price not covered by a down payment. For most buyers, especially first-time buyers, that means taking out a conventional mortgage from a financial institution.


The month of September marks both the end of summer and the beginning of the new school year for millions of Canadian children, teenagers, and young adults. And, whatever the age of the student or the grade level to which he or she is returning, there will inevitably be costs which must be incurred in relation to the return to school. Those costs can range from a few hundred dollars for school supplies for grade school and high school students to thousands (or tens of thousands) of dollars for the cost of post-secondary or professional education.


The administrative policy of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) with respect to charities has been that no more than 10% of a registered charity’s resources can be allocated to non-partisan political activity. Where the CRA views a charity as having exceeded that threshold it may impose sanctions, up to and including revocation of a charity’s charitable registration status.


Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one dealing with personal issues, and one dealing with corporate issues.


  • Third Party Disclosure of Income - CRA reassessed a taxpayer to include income based on the results of the audit of a company which listed the taxpayer as a Subcontractor.             
  • Rental Property: Receipt Retention - A taxpayer had disposed of a rental property and CRA reduced the Adjusted Cost Base claimed by the taxpayer.
  • U.S. Snowbird: New U.S. Visa!- Proposing to allow Canadians aged 55 and older to spend 240 days in the country without a Visa is on track to become law.
  • Dropbox.com - Dropbox.com is a popular serivce which enables users to synchronize, share and back-up files via computer, tablet or iphone.

Virtually all Canadian snowbirds know they must keep track of how many days they are in the US and outside of Canada. Given the importance of “day count,” why do so few travellers (relatively speaking) trigger an examination based on the amount of time they have spent in either country? prior to 2014 neither the US nor Canada knew how many days someone had been within its borders. That will change in 2014 as new rules go into effect. All snowbirds need to know how this change will affect them.

ROY A BERG JD, LLM
Moody gartner tax law
Published: Monday, November 25, 2013


Most retirees who make the annual pilgrimage to the sunshine states already know how long they're allowed to stay in the United States without making immigration officials testy: fewer than 183 days.  But that limit could change - maybe just not this year.

KIRA VERMOND
The Globe and Mail
Published: Friday, November 22, 2013


Could your corporation be classified as a Personal Service Business?  Read about the tax implications.

Automobile audits by the Canada Revenue Agency ("CRA") are very common. Accordingly, these cases should be of particular interest to business owners who use motor vehicles for work and to their tax advisors.


If you are a Canadian citizen who spends a considerable amount of time in the United States, you need to be understand the US tax rules applicable to non-US citizens.