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While there weren’t a great number of tax measures included in the 2018 Fall Economic Statement brought down by the Minister of Finance on November 21, 2018, the tax changes that were announced represented good news for Canadian businesses.


Most Canadians know that the deadline for making contributions to one’s registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) comes after the end of the calendar year, around the end of February. There are, however, some instances an RRSP contribution must be (or should be) made by December 31st, in order to achieve the desired tax result, as follows.


For individual Canadian taxpayers, the tax year ends at the same time as the calendar year. And what that means for individual Canadians is that any steps taken to reduce their tax payable for 2018 must be completed by December 31, 2018. (For individual taxpayers, the only significant exception to that rule is registered retirement savings plan contributions, which can be made any time up to and including March 1, 2019, and claimed on the return for 2018.)


The holiday season is usually costly, but few Canadians are aware that those costs can include increased income tax liability resulting from holiday gifts and celebrations. It doesn’t seem entirely in the spirit of the season to have to consider possible tax consequences when attending holiday celebrations and receiving gifts; however, our tax system extends its reach into most areas of the lives of Canadians, and the holidays are no exception. Fortunately, the possible negative tax consequences are confined to a minority of fact situations and relationships, usually involving employers and employees, and are entirely avoidable with a little advance planning.


Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one dealing with personal issues, and one dealing with corporate issues.


Getting a post-secondary education – or professional training – isn’t inexpensive. Tuition costs can range from as little as $5,000 per year for undergraduate studies to as much as $40,000 in tuition for a year of professional education. And those costs don’t factor in necessary expenditures on textbooks and other ancillary costs, to say nothing of general living expenses, like rent, transportation and food.


When the Canada Pension Plan was launched in the mid-1960s, both the working lives and the retirements of Canadians looked a lot different than they do in 2018. Fifty years ago, most Canadians were able to work at a single full-time job, often held that job for most or all of their working lives and, in many cases, benefitted from an employer sponsored defined benefit pension plan which guaranteed a certain level of income in retirement.


Most Canadians deal with our tax system only once a year, when preparing the annual tax return. And, while that return – the T1 Individual Income Tax Return – may be only four pages long, the information on those four pages is supported by 13 supplementary federal schedules, dealing with everything from the calculation of the tax-free gain on the sale of a principal residence to the determination of required Canada Pension Plan contributions by self-employed taxpayers.


Anyone who has ever tried to reduce their overall personal or household debt knows that doing so, no matter how disciplined one’s approach, can seem like a one step forward, two steps back proposition. It sometimes seems that, just as measurable progress is achieved in one area (an extra payment is made on the mortgage), unexpected costs in another area (a significant car repair bill) push up the level of debt elsewhere (e.g., credit card debt).


  • Third Party Disclosure of Income - CRA reassessed a taxpayer to include income based on the results of the audit of a company which listed the taxpayer as a Subcontractor.             
  • Rental Property: Receipt Retention - A taxpayer had disposed of a rental property and CRA reduced the Adjusted Cost Base claimed by the taxpayer.
  • U.S. Snowbird: New U.S. Visa!- Proposing to allow Canadians aged 55 and older to spend 240 days in the country without a Visa is on track to become law.
  • Dropbox.com - Dropbox.com is a popular serivce which enables users to synchronize, share and back-up files via computer, tablet or iphone.

Virtually all Canadian snowbirds know they must keep track of how many days they are in the US and outside of Canada. Given the importance of “day count,” why do so few travellers (relatively speaking) trigger an examination based on the amount of time they have spent in either country? prior to 2014 neither the US nor Canada knew how many days someone had been within its borders. That will change in 2014 as new rules go into effect. All snowbirds need to know how this change will affect them.

ROY A BERG JD, LLM
Moody gartner tax law
Published: Monday, November 25, 2013


Most retirees who make the annual pilgrimage to the sunshine states already know how long they're allowed to stay in the United States without making immigration officials testy: fewer than 183 days.  But that limit could change - maybe just not this year.

KIRA VERMOND
The Globe and Mail
Published: Friday, November 22, 2013


Could your corporation be classified as a Personal Service Business?  Read about the tax implications.

Automobile audits by the Canada Revenue Agency ("CRA") are very common. Accordingly, these cases should be of particular interest to business owners who use motor vehicles for work and to their tax advisors.


If you are a Canadian citizen who spends a considerable amount of time in the United States, you need to be understand the US tax rules applicable to non-US citizens.